What’s a Global Math Story?

In the field of education, global is a constant buzzword. School administrators, state boards and parents continually call for teachers to weave global themes into their lessons. In recognition of the many requirements already consuming teachers’ time and attention, we started the Global Math Stories (GMS) site to support teachers in making global connections.

From kindergarten through high school, students are fascinated with what life looks like in different parts of the world. They enjoy learning about places where goats climb trees, where children go to school on boats or where ancient rock formations mystify scientists. Calculating the area of a rectangle becomes a much more engaging task when that rectangle is the floor of a tree house in Papua New Guinea!

We’ve set each GMS in a compelling context with enough information so that teachers can choose to:

  • print the story word-for-word
  • send their students to the individual GMS webpage
  • retell it verbally according to grade level

Embedded in each GMS are numbers and facts that provide the building blocks for STEM investigations. To give teachers a head start, we’ve also included sample math questions, social justice and other extension questions, as well as links to videos and other sources.

If you’re interested in submitting a GMS (we hope you will), all you need to do is:

  1. Pick an interesting location anywhere on the globe. Maybe one you’ve visited or one that’s on your bucket list.
  2. Write up your one-page story about it. We’ll do the polishing so don’t worry about making it sound perfect.
  3. Create at least four math questions and an extension or social justice question. An activity or worksheet is also a great option.
  4. Find pictures and links that you’d like us to include with your GMS. This is only optional, so feel free to send the story as is.
  5. Email your GMS to explore@t2tglobal.org or submit it on this Google form. Give yourself a pat on the back for contributing to global education!

Questions? Contact explore@t2tglobal.org for help.

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